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HEALTH in FOCUS

HEALTH IN FOCUS aims to provide multiple sources for relevant information regarding the health and well being of Asian Americans, Native Hawaiians, and Pacific Islanders.

In our TODAY in HEALTH section, check out the most current information, resources, and position statements on the clinical health issues affecting Asian American, Native Hawaiian, and Pacific Islander communities. Check back for updated information on the key issues of hepatitis B, cancer, mental health, cardiovascular disease, and diabetes. Our RESOURCES section connects you to national organizations and federal agencies that serve Asian Americans, Native Hawaiians, and Pacific Islanders.

 

TODAY in HEALTH – information, resources, and position statements on the clinical health issues affecting Asian American, Native Hawaiian, and Pacific Islanders.

Topics: DIABETES    HEPATITIS B


DIABETES

Asian American, Native Hawaiian, and Pacific Islander (AANHPI) patients should talk to their health care providers about diabetes and routine screening. Diabetes is a serious health concern, with Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander populations especially at risk. There is a startling 47% diabetes prevalence in American Samoans, 20% diabetes prevalence in Native Hawaiians, and 10% among Asian Americans, compared with 8% of the US general population.

Although Asian Americans have a lower body weight, they are twice as likely to develop diabetes compared to Caucasian Americans. Even a small amount of weight gain above Western standards greatly increases the risk of developing diabetes; the accepted standard for BMI is not, therefore, a good benchmark for people of Asian descent to measure risk for developing the disease.

During regular annual check-up, patients should ask for screenings for diabetes, which are critical to prevention, early detection, and better health outcomes.

Links on Diabetes:

Library: 2011 Diabetes Symposium – Recap, Summary and Next Steps | top |




HEPATITIS B

Routine screening and vaccination for Hepatitis B is vital for Asian and Pacific Islanders, and a crucial component of good primary care. A one-time check of HBsAg and HBsAb should be done for all Asian and Pacific Islander immigrants. With over 250 million Asians infected worldwide, many pass Hepatitis B to their children unknowingly. Unaware that they have been infected, one out of 12 Asians and Pacific Islanders lives with this chronic infection that, if not monitored, could lead to liver cancer or liver failure.

Links on Hepatitis B:

Position Statements: Library: | top |


 

RESOURCES

APIAHF
AAPCHO
OMH
NMA
AHCI
AMA
IMG(AMA)
FDA



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